Pretty, Fizzy Paradise

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Monday, September 08, 2008

Okay, the truth is, it's been one hell of a night. So, um. No post for you. Serious. But as I could really use some escapist cheering up, someone recommend a good fantasy or sci-fi book to me.

Anything you've enjoyed lately would be great. :-)

17 Comments:

  • At September 08, 2008 6:46 AM, Blogger Will Staples said…

    The Journeys of the Catechist by Alan Dean Foster.

     
  • At September 08, 2008 7:29 AM, Anonymous Dan said…

    I'm not usually a big fantasy fan but I've recently finished reading Robin Hobb's Farseer trilogy (Assassin's Apprentice, Royal Assassin & Assassin's Quest) and enjoyed it immensely.

    For SF, I enjoyed Michael Marshall Smith's Only Forward and Spares. His short story collection More Tomorrow & Other Stories was also fun.

     
  • At September 08, 2008 8:40 AM, Blogger Nick said…

    Novel wise

    "Storm Front" by Jim Butcher, great book, wizard and detective genres are mixed well.

    "Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" by Douglas Adams...you've probably read it but, it's good for scifi and humor.

     
  • At September 08, 2008 8:55 AM, Blogger jhota said…

    Night Shift or Working For The Devil. both by Lilith Saintcrow.

     
  • At September 08, 2008 9:03 AM, Anonymous Willow-Bee the Cat said…

    So long as you don't mind overly dramatic romances, Twilight by Stephanie Meyer.

     
  • At September 08, 2008 9:05 AM, Blogger Matthew E said…

    To Say Nothing of the Dog, Connie Willis. Time-travel comedy of manners.

     
  • At September 08, 2008 11:20 AM, Anonymous Dan said…

    Nick mentioning Jim Butcher reminds me that Mike Carey's Felix Castor books have been quite entertaining so far: John Constantine + Harry Dresden = Felix Castor (more or less).

     
  • At September 08, 2008 12:21 PM, Blogger Saranga said…

    I second Robin Hobb's Farseer books. Also George R R Martin's Song of Ice and Fire. Very very good but not a light read and weighs a ton. Well worth it though. You'll defintiely get lost in it.

     
  • At September 08, 2008 12:55 PM, Blogger LurkerWithout said…

    Hobb tends to be a pretty depressing writer. Especially at the midpoint of a trilogy. So possibly not the escapism you're looking for. Have you tried A. Lee Martinez? Gil's All Fright Diner or In the Company of Ogres can make for a good start...

    Or perhaps Jasper Fforde's two Nursery Crime books The Big Over Easy and The Fourth Bear...

     
  • At September 08, 2008 12:57 PM, Blogger Your Obedient Serpent said…

    Here's a second vote for Jim Butcher's Dresden Files series. I've been ripping through them for the last two or three weeks.

    I'd also recommend Charles Stross. Singularity Sky, The Atrocity Archive, and The Family Trade are all starting points for various series, though the last one is the only one to go past two volumes.

    Stross's Glasshouse is technically a sequel to Accelerando, but it stands entirely on its own -- and, frankly, while I like Accelerando, I don't recommend it as someone's First Stross. I read Glasshouse first, and I think that's the way to do it.

     
  • At September 08, 2008 1:37 PM, OpenID storyjunkie said…

    Paladin of Souls by Bujold was a recent delight.

    Sense of humor, middle-aged female protagonist who argues with Gods. Nice language usage.

     
  • At September 08, 2008 3:00 PM, Blogger Ferrous Buller said…

    So long as you don't mind overly dramatic romances, Twilight by Stephanie Meyer.

    R U SRS?!?!

    On the oldie-but-goodie front, I just started re-reading The Phoenix Guards and am enjoying it: it's Steven Brust's take on "The Three Musketeers," set within Brust's Dragaera.

     
  • At September 08, 2008 4:14 PM, Anonymous Michael Rawdon said…

    I just finished the third book in Karl Schroeder's Virga series (I'm not sure if it's a trilogy or if there's more yet to come; could go either way), and it's great! The three books are Sun of Suns, Queen of Candesce and Pirate Sun.

     
  • At September 08, 2008 6:11 PM, Blogger Jeff said…

    Newcomer Patrick Rothfuss has his first novel The Name of the Wind in paperback. Sure it's longish but I have yet to have anyone to whom I've recommended it not enjoy it.

     
  • At September 08, 2008 7:56 PM, OpenID looking2dastars said…

    "Hood" and "Scarlet" by Stephen Lawhead. It's Robin Hood set in during the Norman Invasion of Wales, with a Marian who is tough without being "generic girl of the group".

     
  • At September 09, 2008 7:22 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said…

    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson. It will cover both your sci-fi and fantasy needs.

     
  • At September 09, 2008 8:58 AM, Anonymous Scott said…

    Surfing Samurai Robots by Mel Gilden. It has robots, surfers, and hard-boiled alien detectives with oversized noses.

    This book and its sequels gave me so much joy when I was a kid. :)

     

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